Photo: A coyote finishes its meal

Clever and adaptive, coyotes flourish over much of North America, in part because of their keen hunting and foraging skills.

Photograph by Michael S. Quinton

Map

Map: Coyote range

Coyote Range

Audio

Fast Facts

Type:
Mammal
Diet:
Omnivore
Average life span in the wild:
Up to 14 years
Size:
Head and body, 32 to 37 in (81 to 94 cm); Tail, 16 in (41 cm)
Weight:
20 to 50 lbs (9 to 23 kg)
Group name:
Pack
Did you know?
Coyotes are very good swimmers. In areas of the northeast United States, where coyotes have migrated since the 20th century, the animals have colonized the Elizabeth Islands of Massachusetts.
Size relative to a 6-ft (2-m) man:
Illustration: Coyote compared with adult man

The coyote appears often in the tales and traditions of Native Americans—usually as a very savvy and clever beast. Modern coyotes have displayed their cleverness by adapting to the changing American landscape. These members of the dog family once lived primarily in open prairies and deserts, but now roam the continent's forests and mountains. They have even colonized cities like Los Angeles, and are now found over most of North America. Coyote populations are likely at an all-time high.

These adaptable animals will eat almost anything. They hunt rabbits, rodents, fish, frogs, and even deer. They also happily dine on insects, snakes, fruit, grass, and carrion. Because they sometimes kill lambs, calves, or other livestock, as well as pets, many ranchers and farmers regard them as destructive pests.

Coyotes are formidable in the field where they enjoy keen vision and a strong sense of smell. They can run up to 40 miles (64 kilometers) an hour. In the fall and winter, they form packs for more effective hunting.

Coyotes form strong family groups. In spring, females den and give birth to litters of three to twelve pups. Both parents feed and protect their young and their territory. The pups are able to hunt on their own by the following fall.

Coyotes are smaller than wolves and are sometimes called prairie wolves or brush wolves. They communicate with a distinctive call, which at night often develops into a raucous canine chorus.

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