Photo: Golden eagle with a mountain backdrop

The national bird of Mexico, golden eagles are North America's largest raptor.

Photograph by Joe McDonald/Animals Animals—Earth Scenes

Map

Map: Golden eagle range

Golden Eagle Range

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Fast Facts

Type:
Bird
Diet:
Carnivore
Average life span in the wild:
30 years
Size:
33 to 38 in (84 to 97 cm); Wingspan, 6 to 7.5 ft (1.8 to 2.3 m)
Weight:
6 to 15 lbs (3 to 7 kg)
Size relative to a 6-ft (2-m) man:
Illustration: Golden eagle compared with adult man

This powerful eagle is North America's largest bird of prey and the national bird of Mexico. These birds are dark brown, with lighter golden-brown plumage on their heads and necks. They are extremely swift, and can dive upon their quarry at speeds of more than 150 miles (241 kilometers) per hour.

Golden eagles use their speed and sharp talons to snatch up rabbits, marmots, and ground squirrels. They also eat carrion, reptiles, birds, fish, and smaller fare such as large insects. They have even been known to attack full grown deer. Ranchers once killed many of these birds for fear that they would prey on their livestock, but studies showed that the animal's impact was minimal. Today, golden eagles are protected by law.

Golden eagle pairs maintain territories that may be as large as 60 square miles (155 square kilometers). They are monogamous and may remain with their mate for several years or possibly for life. Golden eagles nest in high places including cliffs, trees, or human structures such as telephone poles. They build huge nests to which they may return for several breeding years. Females lay from one to four eggs, and both parents incubate them for 40 to 45 days. Typically, one or two young survive to fledge in about three months.

These majestic birds range from Mexico through much of western North America as far north as Alaska; they also appear in the east but are uncommon. Golden eagles are also found in Asia, northern Africa, and Europe.

Some golden eagles migrate, but others do not—depending on the conditions of their geographic location. Alaskan and Canadian eagles typically fly south in the fall, for example, while birds that live in the western continental U.S. tend to remain in their ranges year-round.

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